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Application Note: Ultra-High Resolution Pattern Transfer

High-resolution lithography has played a central role in the nanotechnology revolution of the past decade. While ultra-high resolution lithography (<50 nm) is the focus of many research and industrial efforts, pattern transfer – the subsequent step to lithography – presents many challenges of its own.

This application note shows how we can combine the capabilities of the NanoFrazor lithography with especially customized etching and lift-off methods for the successful transfer of ultra-high resolution patterns.

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